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#376 21 Jul 2020 6:34 pm

Bergen_Guy
Member
Registered: 6 Feb 2020
Posts: 173

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Gents, both boats are looking very very good. SP, your level of preparation, as always, is exemplary. I am sure that your deck will go on just fine!  Martin, I think your row of cleats looks pretty neat, everything is easily at hand, and after a few sails I guess you will automatically reach for the right line. I like the piece they are attached to, that’s neat. I use a canoe portage trolley a lot for moving Svale around. Like you I put the wheels under the bow, and just hold under the skeg aft. The weight of the boat appears to be sufficient to keep the wheels in place with my wheels, apart from if I try to go over small kerbs, or transition from gravel to tarmac, then I wish the tie down strops were long enough to make an arrangement like yours! Good luck with the first sail.  (When is that?). Nice hatch covers too, where did you find them?

In the few places I have used screws to attach either the deck or the rubbing stake, I had no issues at all getting them out, so I am sure your method will work fine SP, I also love your screw sculpture- I spotted it in the first pic before you introduced its function and wondered what it was!

Good luck with the next steps to you both!

Guy

Last edited by Bergen_Guy (21 Jul 2020 6:58 pm)

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#377 22 Jul 2020 8:21 am

MartinC
Member
Registered: 3 Apr 2020
Posts: 102

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Thanks Guy.

Not sure when the first sail will be - probably early August. I am waiting for inflatable launching rollers delivery from FBK.The hatch covers came from Classic Marine.

One thought:- The only part of the boat which is truly unique to our boats and therefore irreplacable is the forward hatch cover - matching as it does the wood grain of the deck. It is probably impractical to secure it, but I am thinking of sticking a square of polystyrene to the underside so at least it will float high in the water giving me time to retreive it (or time to say goodbye!) if it goes in. Do you two have any ideas on this?

Any thoughts on the best way of securing the tiller to the rudder yoke?

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#378 22 Jul 2020 9:22 am

Bergen_Guy
Member
Registered: 6 Feb 2020
Posts: 173

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

That is a very good point in the forward hatch covers. I suspect they float anyway (I can do a test in a few minutes...) but additional floatation sounds like a good idea. The other option is some sort of tether attached to the underside of the hatch cover and the underside of the deck, but that could get in the way.

As for attaching the tiller to the yoke, I was imagining I would use thin rope for that job and simply lash the two together. Here is an article in the small boats magazine  showing a few variations; https://smallboatsmonthly.com/article/t … an-tiller/


The nice subtle coloured hatch covers and bronze eyes really look classy. Nice.

Back with the results of a flotation test in a bit!

Last edited by Bergen_Guy (22 Jul 2020 9:24 am)

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#379 22 Jul 2020 9:36 am

Bergen_Guy
Member
Registered: 6 Feb 2020
Posts: 173

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

It floats awash!

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#380 22 Jul 2020 9:37 am

Bergen_Guy
Member
Registered: 6 Feb 2020
Posts: 173

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

816833A9-EA3A-4542-878C-44FC484146D5.jpeg

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#381 22 Jul 2020 1:21 pm

spclark
Member
From: "Driftless" Wisconsin USA
Registered: 19 Mar 2020
Posts: 129

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Haven't gotten to details about keeping stuff tethered in the event of a spill but it's not too soon to begin thinking about it, yes! As I'm planning to add a couple of stiffeners to my hatch there'll be ample opportunity for forming an attachment point for a thin cord or lanyard that then would be secured to the hull. Good knowing it floats though!

Took all of 3-1/2 hours yesterday afternoon - one solid respirator & gloves-all-the-time-session mixing batch after batch of epoxy (4 pumps! 4 pumps!) to get my deck bonded. I lost count of just how many batches but as I approached the task in stages there were three of unthickened mix to wet out the hull's contact surfaces in all: forward section to mid-way along cockpit, then another back to the frame behind the cockpit, then the last 1/3 to the stern.

Other batches were thickened as needed with cell-o-fill then loaded into 75ml plastic syringes equipped with shortish pieces of small vinyl tubing. This allowed getting the mix into spaces that otherwise would be too tight for the syringe and my hands while dispensing.

I was careful to time the thickened mix's placement so that the epoxy previously placed had begun to firm up a bit otherwise I'd found earlier that the stuff can get kind of runny. Dispensing through syringes demands a thickened mix that's already thinner than one might employ if spreading with other tools so it's a fine line.

Working_to_Stern.jpeg

This shows the forward 1/3 bonded then secured with the cauls & screws I prepared prior to dry-fitting over the last couple of days. Weights were used where screws would have risked splitting frames and where I wanted to ensure good contact between deck and the forward mast pocket cap at frame #1. This is at part 2 where the forward deck's secured and I've placed epoxy prior to bringing deck down onto hull.

Only dicey part was with the deck held aloft by my Harken Hoister at the very beginning. I had to remove the forward hoister's strap to allow the deck to touch the hull at the stem. A couple of screws at the very stem got things secured enough I could then work my way back along each sheer clamp until I'd approached the point where I stopped with the epoxy, where the two deck sections' puzzle joint is located, shown above. Having drilled all the screw holes during the last dry-fit stage helped keep things lined up once it got really serious.

This last image shows the completed operation from the stern end, all cauls & screws in place and some hefty weights used to bring deck and hull bits together at the centerline before the edges are pinched together:

Deck_Bond_Complete.jpeg

Squeeze-out was removed as further work proceeded. There's a smallish gap - on the order of 1/32" / ~ 0.3mm or less - at the shear/deck joint. That appears to have been nicely filled with the thickened epoxy, the cauls helping to keep things under pressure despite the screws not being cinched down tightly.

Just this morning, roughly 16 hours after the bonding operation was completed, I broke all the screws free by hand with a satisfying snap from each. Only one screw failed to loosen, breaking off about 0.5cm under the head. Probably a defective screw... came away easily in a pair of vice grips after I pulled the caul free exposing the broken shank.

So tonight after work I'll fill all the screw holes with a thinnish mix of epoxy & cell-o-fill using a syringe & needle. Expect to place deck's fiberglass sheathing this weekend.

Did any of you add fillets to the deck stringer - deck angle or the frames at both ends of the cockpit once you'd bonded your deck in place? I'm contemplating that as something worth doing while I can have the hull held aloft upside down now.

And a last note: with all the weights off but the cauls still screwed down, I got an idea of weight at this stage - 115 lbs / 52.3kg.

Last edited by spclark (22 Jul 2020 1:23 pm)

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#382 22 Jul 2020 1:58 pm

MartinC
Member
Registered: 3 Apr 2020
Posts: 102

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Well done SP! That's the last major milestone passed.

Yes. With the boat bottom up, I knealt underneath  the cockpit and applied fillets where I could reach, partly to give extra strength but mainly to tidy up the join where epoxy had squeezed out and I couldn't chip it off neatly.

You have just got the final 'breath holding' moment of cutting the deck hatch now!

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#383 22 Jul 2020 8:52 pm

Bergen_Guy
Member
Registered: 6 Feb 2020
Posts: 173

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Exemplary SP, as we have come to expect from you now! Well done, I look forward to seeing the rest come together. Yes, I also did a round of fillets on the inside where I could easily reach them.

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#384 25 Jul 2020 8:09 am

MartinC
Member
Registered: 3 Apr 2020
Posts: 102

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Single handed car topping technique is developing. Getting Gaia up onto the roof is OK now, but I am still working at a slick removal technique which isn't too fast! It is the length rather than the weight which is causing me some headscratching!mini_Gaia-on-car.jpeg

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#385 25 Jul 2020 2:41 pm

MartinC
Member
Registered: 3 Apr 2020
Posts: 102

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

I stumbled across this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x75AlukV3q4 which may be of interest.

It is a bit late for me at my stage of the build, and the fitting out is not the direction I am going in, but it has some interesting ideas.

I had not thought of securing the masts in place (presumably in the event of a capsize), but I have asked Dillon for his thoughts having sailed one for several years. If I do put them in I think I'll do it below the deck rather than above.

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#386 27 Jul 2020 4:18 pm

MartinC
Member
Registered: 3 Apr 2020
Posts: 102

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Dillon felt that pinning the masts in isn't really necessary as the downhaul keeps them in. He has never had an issue with this.

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#387 27 Jul 2020 6:35 pm

spclark
Member
From: "Driftless" Wisconsin USA
Registered: 19 Mar 2020
Posts: 129

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

MartinC wrote:

Dillon felt that pinning the masts in isn't really necessary as the downhaul keeps them in. He has never had an issue with this.

I'd think so too, and for the mizzen the halyard ought to serve the same purpose. It's unlikely that its halyard'd be in play during a capsize so it'd be holding the mast in nicely until things are brought back to something approaching normal orientation once again.

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#388 27 Jul 2020 6:41 pm

spclark
Member
From: "Driftless" Wisconsin USA
Registered: 19 Mar 2020
Posts: 129

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

As for me I overlooked how opaque the microballoon-filled epoxy'd be when I 'filled the weave' yesterday after sticking the 'glass to my deck.... Gonna be a struggle finding those registration holes for the forward hatch cover cut-out and the two mast pockets up that way. (Put an e-mail to Dillon earlier so maybe he can get me some numbers I can measure back from the stem to locate those things along the deck's centerline.)

Deck_Glassedfilled.jpeg

I made a small plastic radius template before I set out to plane-then-sand the sheer's edges. Seemed to work as intended, got a nice even 5/16" radius the 'glass was reasonably easy to stick to:

Fill_Details.jpeg

'Glass overlapped onto panel #4 minimum 1-1/2" in some areas, others closer to the recommended 2". Will be sanding this down carefully once that stuff's cured a bit more, then I'll add more fairing mix to ensure there's nothing weird once it's time to paint.

(Sure hope to find the CLC forum members' suggestions about filling the weave this way turns out to be true! I'd hate to have to be sanding stuff as hard as unfilled epoxy at this stage! The microballoon mix is supposed to be much easier to sand as well as lighter than an equal volume of unfilled resin mix!)

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#389 27 Jul 2020 7:21 pm

MartinC
Member
Registered: 3 Apr 2020
Posts: 102

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Looking good SP. I really like the colour!

You could cut the forward and aft access  panels first, and from there you could find the mast cutouts and hatch location by measurement. Just a thoought.

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#390 27 Jul 2020 7:39 pm

spclark
Member
From: "Driftless" Wisconsin USA
Registered: 19 Mar 2020
Posts: 129

Re: Waterlust sailing canoe in Norway

Good point MartinC, I hadn’t thought of that!

I was going to wait until that filler’s sanded before doing any cutting though, but that idea has merit if I don’t hear back from Dillon in the mean time.

As for the color? That’s just the MAS folks’ idea of what color microballoons should be! I have some from WEST also, it’s much lighter, more like pine than mahogany. Only problem using it is it’s ~ 40 years old... kinda lumpy. Needs to be run through a sieve to break it up before adding to mixed epoxy, kind of a pain when I need a lot of it.

I’ll be painting the hull and deck once that stage arrived. Figure paint’s easier to maintain, easier to
look at with an eye to wear and tear.

Last edited by spclark (27 Jul 2020 7:39 pm)

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